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Current Projects

At Memory's Table
heritage cookbooks - family reunion planning - family history projects
Learn about the services I provide here.

Old School Kolaches
I bake and deliver pans of 24 kolaches every weekday morning in South or Central Austin, TX.  To order for your office or group, go here.

Co-Curator - Texas Czechs: Rooted in Tradition 
A multi-media exhibit that celebrates the rich culture of Texans of Czech descent, by highlighting current ethnic traditions and community activities through text, photography, film, and objects. Pieces of the exhibit are currently on rotating display at the Czech School of Dallas/Sokol Hall in Dallas, TX. For location directions and specific times to view email eventinfo@sokoldallas.org or call 214-368-5608. Read an article about the exhibit here.

Private Baking Classes
I'll come to your home (or you come to mine) with all ingredients and supplies to make kolaches, klobasniky, and strudel. Contact me for details.


Popular posts from this blog

How to Eat Texas Czech in October

October is Czech Heritage Month in Texas. What a fitting excuse to eat and learn about Czech and Texas Czech traditional foods. At the bottom of this post are several events at which you can do just that.

If you want to cook Czech food in October, by all means cook local and seasonal. In Texas in October, there are lots of fruits and vegetables to buy at your local farmers market that are widely used in the Texas Czech kitchen. Here are some suggestions.


apples and pears - make kolach fillings, pies, and bundt cakes, or pear preservescauliflower - make fried cauliflower or pickled cauliflowercabbage - make sauerkraut, fried cabbage, zelniky (cabbage kolaches), slaw, or sauerkraut saladokra - make stewed okra with tomatoes
Last weekend I tried yet another sauerkraut recipe (pictured above), this one with apples and potatoes. It was just the right balance of sweet and sour and rich and tangy. I used Granny Smith apples so things didn't get too sweet and served it with pan-fried sausag…

What I Learned Making 600 Kolaches

The last week in July, I launched a home baking business called Old School Kolaches, offering pans of made from scratch kolaches, delivered to customers' doors. I got laid off in April and in reaction to scrolling endlessly through disheartening job boards at 50 years old, I decided I'd try doing something I'm good at and passionate about that also pays some of my bills (work and love don't always go together unfortunately.) It remains to be seen whether this can be instead of or in additional to a standard 9 to 5 job for me.

Austin, though it's the state capitol, is a wasteland when it comes to traditional kolaches. The one place I went to here that had decent kolaches closed down only weeks ago. There are instead two kolache bakery chains, countless donut shops that offer hotdogs wrapped in croissants or tasteless dough and call them kolaches, or one hipster beer and kolaches place that "elevates the classic Central Texas Czech pastry to gourmet status" …

Buchta with Nuts and Raisins

In his photo book Journeys into Czech Moravian Texas, author Sean N. Gallup wrote a few paragraphs about food in contemporary Texas- Czech culture. During his fieldwork, he observed "Other Texas-Czech pastries [besides kolaches] include klobasniky.... and buchta, a larger fruit filled loaf.... " (Texas A&M University Press, 1998).

Though my grandmother made an apricot buchta (or she just called it a roll), more common buchty might be poppyseed or cream cheese. Less common seems to be the buchta I've made filled with nuts and raisins. The Czech word "buchta" doesn't seem to be surviving as well as the word "kolach" either, for though Gallup mentions it third in a list of common Texas Czech pastries, I've found it almost impossible to find a recipe in a community cookbook that actually uses the word buchta. Instead, I find recipes for "rolls".  Still, Westfest actually has a buchta category in it's annual baking contest. And po…